"… If you, who adhere to this religion, have the same attitude toward yourselves that you have toward your fellow men; if you refuse to let your own suffering lie upon you even for an hour and if you constantly try to prevent and forestall all possible distress way ahead of time; if you experience suffering and displeasure as evil, hateful, worthy of annihilation, and as a defect of existence, then it is clear that besides your religion of pity you also harbor another religion in your heart that is perhaps the mother of the religion of pity; the religion of comfortableness. How little you know of human happiness, you comfortable and benevolent people, for happiness and unhappiness are sisters and even twins that either grow up together or, as in your case, remain small together… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. The will to suffer and those who feel pity. 338. Book Four. The Gay Science.
@2 years ago with 66 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… We must constantly give birth to our thoughts out of our pain, and nurture them with everything we have in us of blood, heart, fire, pleasure, passion, agony, conscience, fate, and catastrophe. Life to us — that means constantly transforming everything we are into light and flame, as well as everything that happens to us… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. 3. Preface. The Gay Science. 
@2 years ago with 123 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… Henceforth alone and sorely mistrustful of myself, I thus, and not without a sullen wrathfulness, took sides against myself and for everything painful and difficult precisely for me: — thus I again found my way to that courageous pessimism that is the antithesis of all romantic mendacity, and also, as it seems to me today, the way to ‘myself’, to my task. That concealed and imperious something for which we for long have no name until it finally proves to be our task — this tyrant in us takes a terrible retribution for every attempt we make to avoid or elude it, for every premature decision, for every association on equal terms with those with whom we do not belong, for every activity, however respectable, if it distracts us from our chief undertaking, even indeed for every virtue that would like to shield us from the severity of our own most personal responsibility. Illness is the answer every time we begin to doubt our right to our task — every time we begin to make things easier for ourselves. Strange and at the same time terrible! It is our alleviations for which we have to atone the most! And if we afterwards want to return to health, we have no choice: we have to burden ourselves more heavily than we have ever been burdened before … ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. 4. Preface. Volume II. Human, All Too Human. 
@2 years ago with 36 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… ‘So long as one always lays the blame on others one still belongs to the mob, when one always assumes responsibility oneself one is on the path of wisdom; but the wise man blames no one, neither himself nor others.’ — Who says this? — Epictetus, eighteen hundred years ago. — It was heard but forgotten. — No, it was not heard and forgotten: not everything gets forgotten. But there was lacking an ear for it, the ear of Epictetus. — So did he say it into his own ear? — Yes, that is how it is: wisdom is the whispering of the solitary to himself in the crowded marketplace… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. The missing ear. 386. Assorted Opinions And Maxims. Human, All Too Human. 
@2 years ago with 59 notes
#Nietzsche #Epictetus 

"… “My thoughts,” said the wanderer to his shadow, “should show me where I stand; but they should not betray to me where I am going. I love my ignorance of the future and do not wish to perish of impatience and of tasting promised things ahead of time… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. Delight in blindness. 287. Book Four. The Gay Science. 
@2 years ago with 64 notes
#Nietzsche 

"

… No one can construct for you the bridge upon which precisely you must cross the stream of life, no one but you yourself alone. There are, to be sure, countless paths and bridges and demi-gods which would bear you through this stream; but only at the cost of yourself: you would put yourself in pawn and lose yourself. There exists in the world a single path along which no one can go except you: whither does it lead? Do not ask, go along it. Who was it who said: ‘a man never rises higher than when he does not know whither his path can still lead him?’

But how can we find ourselves again? How can man know himself/ He is a thing dark and veiled; and if the hare has seven skins, man can slough off seventy times seven and still not be able to say: ‘this is really you, this is no longer outer shell’. Moreover, it is a painful and dangerous undertaking thus to tunnel into oneself and to force one’s way down into the shaft of one’s being by the nearest path. A man who does it can easily so hurt himself that no physician can cure him. And, moreover again, what need should there be for it, since everything bears witness to what we are, our friendships enmities, our glance and the clasp of our hand, our memory and that which we do not remember, our books and our handwriting. This, however, is the means by which an inquiry into the most important aspect can be initiated. Let the youthful soul look back on life with the question: what have you truly loved up to now, what has drawn your soul aloft, what has mastered it and at the same time blessed it? Set up these revered objects before you and perhaps their nature and their sequence will give you a law, the fundamental law of your own true self. Compare these objects one with another, see how one completes, expands, surpasses, transfigures another, how they constitute a stepladder upon which you have clambered up to yourself as you are now; for your true nature lies, not concealed deep within you, but immeasurably high above you, or at least above that which you usually take yourself to be… .

"

Friedrich Nietzsche. 1. Schopenhauer as educator. Untimely Meditations. 
@2 years ago with 42 notes
#Nietzsche 

"

… Individuals — being truly in-and-for-themselves — care, as is well known, more for the moment than do their opposites, the herd men, for they consider themselves no less incalculable than the future. They also like to attach themselves to violent men because they credit themselves with the capacity for actions and for information that the mass of men would neither understand nor forgive, while the tyrant or Caesar understands the rights of the individual even in his excesses and has a personal interest in advocating and even abetting a bolder private morality. For he thinks of himself and would like others to think of him in the way Napoleon once expressed in his classical manner:


“I have the right to answer all accusations against me with an eternal ‘That’s me.’ I am apart from all the world and accept conditions from nobody. I demand subjection even to my fancies, and people should find it quite natural when I yield to this or that distraction.” That is how Napoleon once replied to his wife when she had reasons to question the marital fidelity of her husband.


The times of corruption are those when the apples fall from the tree: I mean the individuals, for they carry the seeds of the future and are the authors of the spiritual colonization and origin of new states and communities. Corruption is merely a nasty word for the autumn of a people… .

"

Friedrich Nietzsche. The signs of corruption. 23. Book One. The Gay Science. 
@2 years ago with 14 notes
#Nietzsche 

"What does your conscience say? — “You shall become the person you are.” Where are your greatest dangers? — In pity. What do you love in others? — My hopes. Whom do you call bad? — Those who always want to put to shame. What do you consider most humane? — To spare someone shame. What is the seal of liberation? — No longer being ashamed in front of oneself."

Friedrich Nietzsche. 270-275. Book Three. The Gay Science. 
@2 years ago with 48 notes
#Nietzsche 

"

… What has been the greatest sin here on earth so far? Was it not the word of him who said: ‘Woe unto those who laugh now!’

Did he himself find no grounds on earth for laughter? Then he simply did not look. Even a child can find such grounds here.

He — did not love enough: else he would also have loved us who laugh! But he hated and scorned us: weeping and gnashing of teeth he promised for us.

Must one straightway curse where one does not love? That — seems to me bad taste. But that is what he did, this unconditional man. He came from the mob.

And he himself simply did not love enough: else he would have been less angry that he was not loved. All great love does not want love: — it wants more.

Get out of the way of all such unconditional men! That is a poor sick kind, a mob-kind: they look at life sadly; they have the evil eye for this earth.

Get out of the way of all such unconditional men! They have heavy feet and sultry hearts: — they know not how to dance. So how could the earth be light for such as them! …

"

Friedrich Nietzsche. 16. Fourth and Last Part. Thus Spoke Zarathustra. 
@2 years ago with 30 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… He who really wants to get to know something new (be it a person, an event, a book) does well to entertain it with all possible love and to avert his eyes quickly from everything in it he finds inimical, repellent, false, indeed to banish it from mind: so that, for example, he allows the author of a book the longest start and then, like one watching a race, desires with beating heart that he may reach his goal. For with this procedure one penetrates to the heart of the new thing, to the point that actually moves it: and precisely this is what is meant by getting to know it. If one has got this far, reason can afterwards make its reservations; that over-estimation, that temporary suspension of the critical pendulum, was only an artifice for luring forth the soul of a thing… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. Love as artifice. 621. Man Alone With Himself. Human, All Too Human. 
@2 years ago with 55 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… We usually endeavour to acquire a single deportment of feeling, a single attitude of mind towards all the events and situations of life — that above all is what is called being philosophically minded. But for the enrichment of knowledge it may be of more value not to reduce oneself to uniformity in this way, but to listen instead to the gentle voice of each of life’s different situations; these will suggest the attitude of mind appropriate to them. Through thus ceasing to treat oneself as a single rigid and unchanging individuum one takes an intelligent interest in the life and being of many others… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. Being philosophically minded. 618. Man Alone With Himself. Human, All Too Human. 
@2 years ago with 42 notes
#Nietzsche 

"

… The task consists in integrating the unconscious, in bringing together “conscious” and “unconscious.” I have called this the individuation process. At this stage the mother-symbol no longer connects back to the beginning, but points towards the unconscious as the creative matrix of the future. “Entry into the mother” then means establishing a relationship between the ego and the unconscious. Nietzsche probably means something of the kind in his poem:

Why hast thou enticed thyself
Into the old serpent’s Paradise?
Why hast thou stolen
Into thyself, thyself?

A sick man now,
Sick of the serpent’s poison;
A captive now
Who drew the hardest lot:
Bent double
Working in thine own pit,
Encaved within thyself
Burrowing into thyself,
Heavy-handed,
Stiff,
A corpse—
Piled with a hundred burdens,
Loaded to death with thyself,
A knower!
Self-knower!
The wise Zarathustra!
You sought the heaviest burden
And found yourself.

Sunk in his own depths, he is like one buried in the earth; a dead man who has crawled back into the mother; a Kaineus “piled with a hundred burdens” and pressed down to death, groaning beneath the intolerable weight of his own self and his own destiny. Who does not think here of Mithras, who, in the Taurophoria, took his bull (or, as the Egyptian hymn says, “the bull of his mother”), namely his love for his Mater Natura, on his back, and with this heaviest burden set forth on the via dolorosa of the Transitus? The way of this passion leads to the cave in which the bull is sacrificed. So, too, Christ has to bear the Cross to the place of sacrifice, where, according to the Christian version, the Lamb was slain in the form of the god, and was then laid to earth in the sepulchre. The cross, or whatever other heavy burden the hero carries, is himself, or rather the self, his wholeness, which is both God and animal — not merely the empirical man, but the totality of his being, which is rooted in his animal nature and reaches out beyond the merely human towards the divine. His wholeness implies a tremendous tension of opposites paradoxically at one with themselves, as in the cross, their most perfect symbol.


What seems like a poetic figure of speech in Nietzsche is really an age-old myth. It is as if the poet could still sense, beneath the words of contemporary speech and in the images that crowd in upon his imagination, the ghostly presence of bygone spiritual worlds, and possessed the capacity to make them come alive again. As Gerhart Hauptmann says: “Poetry is the art of letting the primordial word resound through the common word.” … .

"

Carl Gustav Jung. The Battle For Deliverance From The Mother. Symbols of Transformation: Two. 
@2 years ago with 29 notes
#Carl Gustav Jung #Nietzsche #Gerhart Hauptmann 

"

… The man who does not wish to belong to the mass needs only to cease taking himself easily; let him follow his conscience, which calls to him: ‘Be your self! All you are now doing, thinking, desiring, is not you yourself.’


Every youthful soul hears this call day and night and trembles when he hears it; for the idea of its liberation gives it a presentiment of the measure of happiness allotted it from all eternity — a happiness to which it can by no means attain so long as it lies fettered by the chains of fear and convention. And how dismal and senseless life can be without this liberation! There exists no more repulsive and desolate creature in the world than the man who has evaded his genius and who now looks furtively to left and right, behind him and all about him. In the end such a man becomes impossible to get hold of, since he is wholly exterior, without kernel, a tattered, painted bag of clothes, a decked-out ghost that cannot inspire fear and certainly not pity. And if it is true to say of the lazy that they kill time, then it is greatly to be feared that an era which sees its salvation in public opinion, that is to say private laziness, is a time that really will be killed: I mean that it will be struck out of the history of the true liberation of life. How reluctant later generations will be to have anything to do with the relics of an era ruled, not by living men, but my pseudo-men dominated by public opinion; for which reason our age may be to some distant posterity the darkest and least known, because least human, portion of human history. I go along the new streets of our cities and think how, of all these gruesome houses which the generation of public opinion has built for itself, not one will be standing in a hundred years’ time, and how the opinions of these house-builders will no doubt by then likewise have collapsed. On the other hand, how right it is for those who do not feel themselves to be citizens of this time to harbour great hopes; for if they were citizens of this time they too would be helping to kill their time and so perish with it — while their desire is rather to awaken their time to life and so live on themselves in this awakened life… .

"

Friedrich Nietzsche. 1. Schopenhauer as Educator. Untimely Meditations. 
@2 years ago with 28 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… Custom represents the experiences of men of earlier times as to what they supposed useful and harmful — but the sense for custom (morality) applies, not to these experiences as such, but to the age, the sanctity, the indiscussability of the custom. And so this feeling is a hindrance to the acquisition of new experiences and the correction of customs: that is to say, morality is a hindrance to the creation of new and better customs: it makes stupid… ."

Friedrich Nietzsche. Morality makes stupid. 19. Book I. Daybreak. 
@2 years ago with 22 notes
#Nietzsche 

"… The absolute necessity of a total liberation from ends: otherwise we should not be permitted to try to sacrifice ourselves and let ourselves go. Only the innocence of becoming gives us the greatest courage and the greatest freedom! …"

Friedrich Nietzsche. 787. Book Three: Principles of A New Evaluation. The Will To Power. 
@2 years ago with 33 notes
#Nietzsche 
"… If you, who adhere to this religion, have the same attitude toward yourselves that you have toward your fellow men; if you refuse to let your own suffering lie upon you even for an hour and if you constantly try to prevent and forestall all possible distress way ahead of time; if you experience suffering and displeasure as evil, hateful, worthy of annihilation, and as a defect of existence, then it is clear that besides your religion of pity you also harbor another religion in your heart that is perhaps the mother of the religion of pity; the religion of comfortableness. How little you know of human happiness, you comfortable and benevolent people, for happiness and unhappiness are sisters and even twins that either grow up together or, as in your case, remain small together… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. The will to suffer and those who feel pity. 338. Book Four. The Gay Science.
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"

… What has been the greatest sin here on earth so far? Was it not the word of him who said: ‘Woe unto those who laugh now!’

Did he himself find no grounds on earth for laughter? Then he simply did not look. Even a child can find such grounds here.

He — did not love enough: else he would also have loved us who laugh! But he hated and scorned us: weeping and gnashing of teeth he promised for us.

Must one straightway curse where one does not love? That — seems to me bad taste. But that is what he did, this unconditional man. He came from the mob.

And he himself simply did not love enough: else he would have been less angry that he was not loved. All great love does not want love: — it wants more.

Get out of the way of all such unconditional men! That is a poor sick kind, a mob-kind: they look at life sadly; they have the evil eye for this earth.

Get out of the way of all such unconditional men! They have heavy feet and sultry hearts: — they know not how to dance. So how could the earth be light for such as them! …

"
Friedrich Nietzsche. 16. Fourth and Last Part. Thus Spoke Zarathustra. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… We must constantly give birth to our thoughts out of our pain, and nurture them with everything we have in us of blood, heart, fire, pleasure, passion, agony, conscience, fate, and catastrophe. Life to us — that means constantly transforming everything we are into light and flame, as well as everything that happens to us… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. 3. Preface. The Gay Science. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… He who really wants to get to know something new (be it a person, an event, a book) does well to entertain it with all possible love and to avert his eyes quickly from everything in it he finds inimical, repellent, false, indeed to banish it from mind: so that, for example, he allows the author of a book the longest start and then, like one watching a race, desires with beating heart that he may reach his goal. For with this procedure one penetrates to the heart of the new thing, to the point that actually moves it: and precisely this is what is meant by getting to know it. If one has got this far, reason can afterwards make its reservations; that over-estimation, that temporary suspension of the critical pendulum, was only an artifice for luring forth the soul of a thing… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. Love as artifice. 621. Man Alone With Himself. Human, All Too Human. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… Henceforth alone and sorely mistrustful of myself, I thus, and not without a sullen wrathfulness, took sides against myself and for everything painful and difficult precisely for me: — thus I again found my way to that courageous pessimism that is the antithesis of all romantic mendacity, and also, as it seems to me today, the way to ‘myself’, to my task. That concealed and imperious something for which we for long have no name until it finally proves to be our task — this tyrant in us takes a terrible retribution for every attempt we make to avoid or elude it, for every premature decision, for every association on equal terms with those with whom we do not belong, for every activity, however respectable, if it distracts us from our chief undertaking, even indeed for every virtue that would like to shield us from the severity of our own most personal responsibility. Illness is the answer every time we begin to doubt our right to our task — every time we begin to make things easier for ourselves. Strange and at the same time terrible! It is our alleviations for which we have to atone the most! And if we afterwards want to return to health, we have no choice: we have to burden ourselves more heavily than we have ever been burdened before … ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. 4. Preface. Volume II. Human, All Too Human. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… We usually endeavour to acquire a single deportment of feeling, a single attitude of mind towards all the events and situations of life — that above all is what is called being philosophically minded. But for the enrichment of knowledge it may be of more value not to reduce oneself to uniformity in this way, but to listen instead to the gentle voice of each of life’s different situations; these will suggest the attitude of mind appropriate to them. Through thus ceasing to treat oneself as a single rigid and unchanging individuum one takes an intelligent interest in the life and being of many others… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. Being philosophically minded. 618. Man Alone With Himself. Human, All Too Human. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… ‘So long as one always lays the blame on others one still belongs to the mob, when one always assumes responsibility oneself one is on the path of wisdom; but the wise man blames no one, neither himself nor others.’ — Who says this? — Epictetus, eighteen hundred years ago. — It was heard but forgotten. — No, it was not heard and forgotten: not everything gets forgotten. But there was lacking an ear for it, the ear of Epictetus. — So did he say it into his own ear? — Yes, that is how it is: wisdom is the whispering of the solitary to himself in the crowded marketplace… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. The missing ear. 386. Assorted Opinions And Maxims. Human, All Too Human. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche #Epictetus 
"

… The task consists in integrating the unconscious, in bringing together “conscious” and “unconscious.” I have called this the individuation process. At this stage the mother-symbol no longer connects back to the beginning, but points towards the unconscious as the creative matrix of the future. “Entry into the mother” then means establishing a relationship between the ego and the unconscious. Nietzsche probably means something of the kind in his poem:

Why hast thou enticed thyself
Into the old serpent’s Paradise?
Why hast thou stolen
Into thyself, thyself?

A sick man now,
Sick of the serpent’s poison;
A captive now
Who drew the hardest lot:
Bent double
Working in thine own pit,
Encaved within thyself
Burrowing into thyself,
Heavy-handed,
Stiff,
A corpse—
Piled with a hundred burdens,
Loaded to death with thyself,
A knower!
Self-knower!
The wise Zarathustra!
You sought the heaviest burden
And found yourself.

Sunk in his own depths, he is like one buried in the earth; a dead man who has crawled back into the mother; a Kaineus “piled with a hundred burdens” and pressed down to death, groaning beneath the intolerable weight of his own self and his own destiny. Who does not think here of Mithras, who, in the Taurophoria, took his bull (or, as the Egyptian hymn says, “the bull of his mother”), namely his love for his Mater Natura, on his back, and with this heaviest burden set forth on the via dolorosa of the Transitus? The way of this passion leads to the cave in which the bull is sacrificed. So, too, Christ has to bear the Cross to the place of sacrifice, where, according to the Christian version, the Lamb was slain in the form of the god, and was then laid to earth in the sepulchre. The cross, or whatever other heavy burden the hero carries, is himself, or rather the self, his wholeness, which is both God and animal — not merely the empirical man, but the totality of his being, which is rooted in his animal nature and reaches out beyond the merely human towards the divine. His wholeness implies a tremendous tension of opposites paradoxically at one with themselves, as in the cross, their most perfect symbol.


What seems like a poetic figure of speech in Nietzsche is really an age-old myth. It is as if the poet could still sense, beneath the words of contemporary speech and in the images that crowd in upon his imagination, the ghostly presence of bygone spiritual worlds, and possessed the capacity to make them come alive again. As Gerhart Hauptmann says: “Poetry is the art of letting the primordial word resound through the common word.” … .

"
Carl Gustav Jung. The Battle For Deliverance From The Mother. Symbols of Transformation: Two. 
2 years ago
#Carl Gustav Jung #Nietzsche #Gerhart Hauptmann 
"… “My thoughts,” said the wanderer to his shadow, “should show me where I stand; but they should not betray to me where I am going. I love my ignorance of the future and do not wish to perish of impatience and of tasting promised things ahead of time… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. Delight in blindness. 287. Book Four. The Gay Science. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"

… The man who does not wish to belong to the mass needs only to cease taking himself easily; let him follow his conscience, which calls to him: ‘Be your self! All you are now doing, thinking, desiring, is not you yourself.’


Every youthful soul hears this call day and night and trembles when he hears it; for the idea of its liberation gives it a presentiment of the measure of happiness allotted it from all eternity — a happiness to which it can by no means attain so long as it lies fettered by the chains of fear and convention. And how dismal and senseless life can be without this liberation! There exists no more repulsive and desolate creature in the world than the man who has evaded his genius and who now looks furtively to left and right, behind him and all about him. In the end such a man becomes impossible to get hold of, since he is wholly exterior, without kernel, a tattered, painted bag of clothes, a decked-out ghost that cannot inspire fear and certainly not pity. And if it is true to say of the lazy that they kill time, then it is greatly to be feared that an era which sees its salvation in public opinion, that is to say private laziness, is a time that really will be killed: I mean that it will be struck out of the history of the true liberation of life. How reluctant later generations will be to have anything to do with the relics of an era ruled, not by living men, but my pseudo-men dominated by public opinion; for which reason our age may be to some distant posterity the darkest and least known, because least human, portion of human history. I go along the new streets of our cities and think how, of all these gruesome houses which the generation of public opinion has built for itself, not one will be standing in a hundred years’ time, and how the opinions of these house-builders will no doubt by then likewise have collapsed. On the other hand, how right it is for those who do not feel themselves to be citizens of this time to harbour great hopes; for if they were citizens of this time they too would be helping to kill their time and so perish with it — while their desire is rather to awaken their time to life and so live on themselves in this awakened life… .

"
Friedrich Nietzsche. 1. Schopenhauer as Educator. Untimely Meditations. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"

… No one can construct for you the bridge upon which precisely you must cross the stream of life, no one but you yourself alone. There are, to be sure, countless paths and bridges and demi-gods which would bear you through this stream; but only at the cost of yourself: you would put yourself in pawn and lose yourself. There exists in the world a single path along which no one can go except you: whither does it lead? Do not ask, go along it. Who was it who said: ‘a man never rises higher than when he does not know whither his path can still lead him?’

But how can we find ourselves again? How can man know himself/ He is a thing dark and veiled; and if the hare has seven skins, man can slough off seventy times seven and still not be able to say: ‘this is really you, this is no longer outer shell’. Moreover, it is a painful and dangerous undertaking thus to tunnel into oneself and to force one’s way down into the shaft of one’s being by the nearest path. A man who does it can easily so hurt himself that no physician can cure him. And, moreover again, what need should there be for it, since everything bears witness to what we are, our friendships enmities, our glance and the clasp of our hand, our memory and that which we do not remember, our books and our handwriting. This, however, is the means by which an inquiry into the most important aspect can be initiated. Let the youthful soul look back on life with the question: what have you truly loved up to now, what has drawn your soul aloft, what has mastered it and at the same time blessed it? Set up these revered objects before you and perhaps their nature and their sequence will give you a law, the fundamental law of your own true self. Compare these objects one with another, see how one completes, expands, surpasses, transfigures another, how they constitute a stepladder upon which you have clambered up to yourself as you are now; for your true nature lies, not concealed deep within you, but immeasurably high above you, or at least above that which you usually take yourself to be… .

"
Friedrich Nietzsche. 1. Schopenhauer as educator. Untimely Meditations. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… Custom represents the experiences of men of earlier times as to what they supposed useful and harmful — but the sense for custom (morality) applies, not to these experiences as such, but to the age, the sanctity, the indiscussability of the custom. And so this feeling is a hindrance to the acquisition of new experiences and the correction of customs: that is to say, morality is a hindrance to the creation of new and better customs: it makes stupid… ."
Friedrich Nietzsche. Morality makes stupid. 19. Book I. Daybreak. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"

… Individuals — being truly in-and-for-themselves — care, as is well known, more for the moment than do their opposites, the herd men, for they consider themselves no less incalculable than the future. They also like to attach themselves to violent men because they credit themselves with the capacity for actions and for information that the mass of men would neither understand nor forgive, while the tyrant or Caesar understands the rights of the individual even in his excesses and has a personal interest in advocating and even abetting a bolder private morality. For he thinks of himself and would like others to think of him in the way Napoleon once expressed in his classical manner:


“I have the right to answer all accusations against me with an eternal ‘That’s me.’ I am apart from all the world and accept conditions from nobody. I demand subjection even to my fancies, and people should find it quite natural when I yield to this or that distraction.” That is how Napoleon once replied to his wife when she had reasons to question the marital fidelity of her husband.


The times of corruption are those when the apples fall from the tree: I mean the individuals, for they carry the seeds of the future and are the authors of the spiritual colonization and origin of new states and communities. Corruption is merely a nasty word for the autumn of a people… .

"
Friedrich Nietzsche. The signs of corruption. 23. Book One. The Gay Science. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"… The absolute necessity of a total liberation from ends: otherwise we should not be permitted to try to sacrifice ourselves and let ourselves go. Only the innocence of becoming gives us the greatest courage and the greatest freedom! …"
Friedrich Nietzsche. 787. Book Three: Principles of A New Evaluation. The Will To Power. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche 
"What does your conscience say? — “You shall become the person you are.” Where are your greatest dangers? — In pity. What do you love in others? — My hopes. Whom do you call bad? — Those who always want to put to shame. What do you consider most humane? — To spare someone shame. What is the seal of liberation? — No longer being ashamed in front of oneself."
Friedrich Nietzsche. 270-275. Book Three. The Gay Science. 
2 years ago
#Nietzsche